Air Traffic Management http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net STRATEGY, TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT FOR THE WORLD'S MOST GLOBAL INDUSTRY Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:53:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 BULATSA chief Dilov replaced by Peev: report http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/bulatsa-chief-dilov-replaced-by-peev-report/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/bulatsa-chief-dilov-replaced-by-peev-report/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:50:05 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26387 More ››]]> Bulgaria’s caretaker transport minister has replaced the chief of its air traffic control agency BULATSA late on Monday, according to Sofia news agency Novinite.

Tsvetan Dilov who was appointed head of BULATSA in September 2013, is being replaced by Georgi Peev, another official of the air navigation service provider since 2000.

Peev was appointed head of the air traffic services unit in 2013 and in 2014 he became head of the air traffic management unit.

Last week, Angelkova replaced officials at Bulgarian state railways and at Sofia airport.

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Europe to extend reach of satellite navigation http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/europe-to-extend-reach-of-satellite-navigation/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/europe-to-extend-reach-of-satellite-navigation/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:08:19 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26380 More ››]]> The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and Eurocontrol have signed a new cooperation agreement to help implement European Union GNSS policies as they apply to the field of aviation.

As Europe’s skies and major airports become increasingly congested, there is need for air traffic management (ATM) technologies to evolve from ground-based infrastructures to more advanced systems based on new technologies.

Eurocontrol and the GSA have a shared objective in developing and exploiting European GNSS technology to improve accessibility, efficiency and safety to European operators, pilots and airports.
To accomplish this objective, the agreement focuses on a range of activities, including:

  • Definition of aviation user requirements for EGNOS and Galileo
  • Introduction of European GNSS services for aviation within the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) area
  • Coordination in aviation research and development
  • Aviation-specific GNSS performance monitoring
  • Promotion of European GNSS aviation activities at the international level

“This is another example of European Commission support of the aviation sector,” says Daniel Calleja Crespo, director general of enterprise and industry at the European Commission. “I am confident that a strong cooperation between the GSA and Eurocontrol will benefit aviation, the European GNSS programmes and indeed European citizens.”

“The full deployment of GNSS offers unprecedented opportunities to further improve air traffic management safety and capacity, while reducing costs at pan-European level,” says GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides. “Eurocontrol’s activities in this field will complement those of the GSA to ensure that the development and implementation of satellite-based navigation provides an optimal solution for European airspace users.”

“Eurocontrol and the GSA share a common objective – the secure and safe implementation of European satellite navigation policies in the aviation sector. The enhanced cooperation between our two organisations means that Eurocontrol will now bring its unequalled capacity to understand, coordinate and represent the needs of the civil and military airspace users to the promotion and development of GNSS.” says Frank Brenner, director general of Eurocontrol.

EGNOS is Europe’s first venture into satellite navigation and has been providing a certified safety service for aviation users since 2011. EGNOS is owned by the European Union and, since 1 January 2014, the GSA is responsible for its exploitation, ensuring service provision, operations, maintenance and evolution.

As an official European Union Regulatory Agency, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) manages public interests related to European GNSS programmes. The Agency’s strategic objectives include the achievement of a fully operational GALILEO system. This includes the laying of foundations for a fully sustainable and economically viable system and its security.

EUROCONTROL, the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation, has as its primary objective to develop a seamless, pan-European air traffic management (ATM) system that fully copes with the growth in air traffic, while maintaining a high level of safety, reducing costs and respecting the environment.

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Airservices debuts digital tower technology http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/airservices-debuts-digital-tower-technology/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/airservices-debuts-digital-tower-technology/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 09:16:52 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26376 More ››]]> UXF3CTRE9U8CSCWOG-1000x666Airservices will fit the latest Integrated Tower Automation Suite (INTAS) digital technology to existing air traffic control towers in the Gold Coast, Perth, Cairns and Brisbane as part of the continuing implementation of this world-leading technology around Australia.

The suite of tower technology combines flight and operational data, surveillance and voice communications into a single integrated, control tower-specific layout.

Airservices executive general manager, air traffic control, Greg Hood said that INTAS brought together operational information and systems currently provided by numerous computer screens and paper based systems throughout each control tower.

It will provide tower controllers with four customisable touch screens displaying electronic flight strips, operational information, weather, terminal area radar displays, and, where available, surface surveillance data.

“By transitioning away from a manual, paper based system, controllers are able to concentrate more on the visual surveillance of the airport and aircraft, leading to increased situational awareness and enhanced safety,” Hood said.

“It also provides controllers with greater information about airport operations, which can be used to enhance airport efficiency and ensure we are well placed to meet the estimated 60 per cent increase in traffic over the next 15 years,” Hood said.

The announcement follows the introduction of INTAS in newly constructed air traffic control towers in Broome, Rockhampton, Adelaide and Melbourne.

“We planned the implementation of this latest technology so that we would have a large amount of experience prior to installation in an operational control tower,” Hood said.

“Due to our safety culture and this previous experience we are in an excellent position to manage this transition to minimise any disruption to operations and continue to operate safely, which is our highest priority.”

In addition to the new technology, each of the towers will also receive upgrades to a range of other systems, including mechanical, electrical, fire and water services.

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Seventh arc remains key to finding MH370 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/seventh-arc-remains-key-to-finding-mh370/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/seventh-arc-remains-key-to-finding-mh370/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 11:51:49 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26367 More ››]]> The 7th Arc The latest information and analysis confirms that MH370 will be found in close proximity to the arc set out in the map and labelled as the 7th arc. At the time MH370 reached this arc, the aircraft is considered to have exhausted its fuel and to have been descending. As a result, the aircraft is unlikely to be more than 20 NM (38 km) to the west or 30 NM (55 km) to the east of the arc. Based on all the independent analysis of satellite communications and aircraft performance, the total extent of the 7th arc reaches from latitude 20 degrees S to 39 degrees S. Refinement of the analysis in the coming weeks will reduce the underwater Search Area along this arc to a prioritised 17,500 sq. NM (60,000 sq. km). The prioritised length of the Search Area along the arc is expected to be 350 NM (650 km). More information about the Search Area will be made available as soon as it is verified.

The 7th Arc
The latest information and analysis confirms that MH370 will be found in close proximity to the arc set out in the map and labelled as the 7th arc. At the time MH370 reached this arc, the aircraft is considered to have exhausted its fuel and to have been descending. As a result, the aircraft is unlikely to be more than 20 NM (38 km) to the west or 30 NM (55 km) to the east of the arc.
Based on all the independent analysis of satellite communications and aircraft performance, the total extent of the 7th arc reaches from latitude 20 degrees S to 39 degrees S.
Refinement of the analysis in the coming weeks will reduce the underwater Search Area along this arc to a prioritised 17,500 sq. NM (60,000 sq. km). The prioritised length of the Search Area along the arc is expected to be 350 NM (650 km).
More information about the Search Area will be made available as soon as it is verified.

All available data indicates the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 entered the sea close to a long but narrow arc of the southern Indian Ocean, according to the Australian search team.

Australia, which is leading the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 at the request of the Malaysian Government, said the underwater search is focused on a high priority area of up to 60,000 square kilometres of ocean floor—roughly the size of Tasmania.

“From early in the search, analysis has consistently indicated a very high probability of finding the aircraft along a defined arc in the southern Indian Ocean where the aircraft last communicated with a ground station through a satellite. This is where the aircraft is assessed to have run out of fuel,” the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) said today.

Since then, complex, ground-breaking technical analysis of limited communications data and aircraft flight information has been developed and refined. This work has concentrated on determining the point on the seventh arc that the aircraft was most likely to have reached. This will enable a prioritised search effort in areas along the seventh arc.

Recent refinement to the analysis has also given the team greater certainty about when the aircraft turned south into the Indian Ocean and has produced a better understanding of the parameters within which the satellite ground station was operating during the last flight of MH370.

Based on these refinements, a search strategy working group is finalising its latest assessment of the highest priority areas for the search, which will most likely extend south of the previous ‘orange’ priority area.

“The complexities surrounding the search cannot be understated,” the ATSB said. “It involves vast areas of the Indian Ocean with only limited known data and aircraft flight information. While it is impossible to determine with certainty where the aircraft may have entered the water, all the available data and analysis indicates a highly probable search area close to a long but narrow arc of the southern Indian Ocean.”

In an operational search update the ATSB said that the team’s effort would continue to be thorough and methodical and that as a result ‘weekly progress may seem slow’. “Please be assured that work is continuing and is aimed at finding MH370 as quickly as possible,” assured the ATSB.

A bathymetric survey that has been ongoing is providing a map of the ocean floor to ensure a safe and effective underwater search. Since 4 September, over 100,000 square kilometres of the wide search area have been surveyed. The priorities for the search will continue to be reviewed and will change over time.

A bathymetric survey that has been ongoing is providing a map of the ocean floor to ensure a safe and effective underwater search. Since 4 September, over 100,000 square kilometres of the wide search area have been surveyed. The priorities for the search will continue to be reviewed and will change over time.

Fugro Equator continues its work under contract to the Australian ATSB to map priority areas for the underwater search although heavy sea conditions have affected the progress of the survey over the past week. The Chinese survey vessel Zhu Kezhen continues survey work in the search area although has suspended survey operations since 6 September to avoid bad weather. The Chinese support vessel Haixun 01 has been stationed at the Port of Fremantle.

The ATSB is leading the search using two Australian-contracted vessels and a Malaysian-contracted vessel. On 7 August, the ATSB entered a contract for the search for MH370 with Fugro Survey Pty Ltd (Fugro).  Two vessels will be provided, Fugro Discovery and Fugro Equator (which is currently being used to survey the search area). Malaysia has contracted the vessel GO Phoenix, with equipment and experts provided by Phoenix International (Phoenix), to take part in the search.

Mobilisation of search assets is already under way. GO Phoenix has completed mobilisation in Singapore and is currently scheduled to begin its assigned search tasks within a fortnight.

Fugro Discovery is en route from the United Kingdom with the search equipment and mission crew to be mobilised on the vessel in Fremantle at the end of September.

Fugro Equator, the vessel currently being used to survey the search area, will be mobilised as the second ATSB contracted search vessel when its bathymetric work is complete by the end of October.

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Carbon standard extends footprint to US http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/carbon-standard-extends-footprint-to-us/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/carbon-standard-extends-footprint-to-us/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 10:39:01 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26355 More ››]]> Olivier Jankovec, Director General, ACI Europe, Mark Reis, Managing Director, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (and 2014 ACI-NA Board Chairman), Elizabeth Leavitt, Director, Aviation Planning & Environment, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, and Kevin Burke, President & CEO, ACI North America.

Olivier Jankovec, Director General, ACI Europe, Mark Reis, Managing Director, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (and 2014 ACI-NA Board Chairman), Elizabeth Leavitt, Director, Aviation Planning & Environment, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, and Kevin Burke, President & CEO, ACI North America.

Following an industry commitment to reduce its carbon emissions seven years ago and the European launch in 2009 of the carbon management standard Airport Carbon Accreditation, last night saw a major development in carbon management for airports in North America.

A ceremony took place at the 2014 Annual Conference & Exhibition of ACI-North America (ACI-NA) in Atlanta, in the presence of more than 1,600 aviation experts, to mark the launch of Airport Carbon Accreditation in North America, in cooperation with ACI-NA.

The institutionally endorsed programme independently assesses and recognises airports’ efforts to manage and reduce their CO2 emissions. It certifies airports at four different levels of accreditation (Mapping, Reduction, Optimisation and Neutrality). In the past twelve months, Airport Carbon Accredited status has been earned by a total of 107 airports in Europe, Africa and Asia-Pacific.

Having already achieved significant results in Europe, Africa & Asia-Pacific, the launch of the programme in North America is a decisive step in the establishment of Airport Carbon Accreditation as the global standard for carbon management at airports.

Kevin Burke, president and CEO of ACI-NA said: “Today’s launch of Airport Carbon Accreditation here in North America shows that our airport industry has become more demanding of itself. The success of the programme in other parts of the world is both an inspiration and a challenge.”

The launch ceremony also saw Seattle-Tacoma International Airport become the very first airport in North America to achieve certification within the programme.

He added “As an ambitious industry, we want to do our part to lower our carbon footprint and become better partners in the global aviation system. I congratulate Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on being the first to achieve certification in North America, leading the way for many others. I also applaud the other North American airports who have committed to becoming early adopters of Airport Carbon Accreditation, including Aeroports de Montreal, Denver International Airport, San Francisco International Airport, and Portland International Airport.”

Olivier Jankovec, director general ACI Europe, Patti Chau, regional director ACI Asia-Pacific and Ali Tounsi, regional director ACI Africa said: “We are delighted to see Airport Carbon Accreditation become available to North American airports today. It’s a big moment for the programme, as it demonstrates the momentum the airport industry’s environmental commitment has gained over the past seven years and the demand for this kind of tool in the North American market.”

They added: “Many industries talk about their commitments. We are getting on with the job and delivering genuine, independently-verified carbon reduction year-on-year. We applaud Seattle-Tacoma International Airport’s certification as the pioneering airport in North America and look forward to seeing others apply for certification at one of the four levels of the programme.”

“This is a significant step to be recognised worldwide for the environmental stewardship programmes we have instituted at Sea-Tac Airport,” said Port of Seattle Commission co-president Stephanie Bowman. “Next year we expect to go even further in the certification as part of our Century Agenda goal to reduce aircraft-related emissions by 25 per cent at Sea-Tac and 50 per cent overall at the Port of Seattle.”

Airport Carbon Accreditation is now live in five continents and the 108 airports certified by the programme welcome 24.2 per cent of global passenger traffic annually.

 

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EGPWS upgrade could have saved Flight 1354 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/ups-failed-to-upgrade-egpws-in-flight-1354-crash/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/ups-failed-to-upgrade-egpws-in-flight-1354-crash/#comments Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:56:29 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26350 More ››]]> The fatal crash of a cargo flight which killed the two pilots on board could have been prevented if US carrier UPS had installed new software on a critical safety system, according to a top aviation safety expert.

Robert Sumwalt, the vice chairman of the US National Transportation Safety Board, made his comments following the release of the air accident investigation into the cause of the UPS Flight 1354 accident at Birmingham, Alabama on August 14, 2013.

The captain and first officer were killed and the aircraft was destroyed when their Airbus A300-600 crashed short of Runway 18 during a non-precision approach. Investigators have concluded that pilot mistakes and deviations from company safety rules primarily caused the crash.

Sumwalt reserved his own criticism for the aircraft operator UPS pointing out that if a newer software version had been available on the aircraft’s Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS), an alert would have sounded 6.5 seconds earlier at 150 feet higher – alerting the two pilots to an excessive rate of descent.

Traditional ground proximity warning systems had some limitations as they work off of an aircraft’s radar altimeter. If the system senses that the aircraft is getting dangerously close to the ground, it alerts the crew. However, since the altimeter is looking straight down and not in front of the aircraft, very steep terrain such as a vertical rock face would give almost no warning. Such traditional systems were also inhibited if the aircraft was in the landing configuration.

The development of EGPWS addressed these issues as the system receives the aircraft’s position and velocity information from either GPS or the aircraft’s INS/IRS. It then checks this position with a terrain database stored in the EGPWS system. The system will look ahead of the aircraft and see if the potential for a collision with terrain exists and it is this predictive ability that allows for greater warning time.

“We don’t know if the pilots would have reacted to the caution. We could not determine whether the new software would have positively prevented the accident or not,” said Sumwalt. “What I can say is if the new software was installed, it would have given the crew a greater opportunity to avoid the crash.”

Sumwalt said he had consulted a number of industry sources and told the meeting that at its 14th flight safety conference in October 2007 European airframer Airbus actively encouraged Airbus operators to upgrade the EGPWS software free of charge.

“Here is an Airbus flight safety conference where Airbus is urging people flying aircraft to install the software,” said Sumwalt who added that in August 2008 the US-based Flight Safety Foundation published an article written by Honeywell’s Don Bateman who had developed the EGPWS system.

In the article titled Indispensable Upgrades, Bateman wrote that while EGPWS has been hailed as one of the greatest accident prevention tools the industry had ever seen it would only be reliable if the software and databases were kept up to date.

“Ironically,” said Sumwalt, “it was reprinted in the UPS pilots’ flight safety publication Safer Skies.

“So you better believe UPS made the decision not to do this. If they had an iPhone, I can guarantee you that they would keep their iPhone software up to date,” said Sumwalt. “Yet the airplanes that are carrying their people and their passengers, their people and their packages, the software is not up to date on a device that could prevent this accident.”

“Had the [smart call outs at 500 and 400 ft] been activated, it would have made crew aware of the close proximity to the ground and they could have taken action to arrest the descent,” said Sumwalt. “Everything UPS does is about efficiency. They have guys running around with clipboards and stopwatches to make sure if an airplane is a minute later someone will be held accountable for it.”

“But the sad thing here, this was a layer of defence. The smart callouts and updates to software could have possibly prevented this accident. If you’re interested in efficiency, I can guarantee you on August 14 of last year those packages on the airplanes did not get delivered by 10:30 in the morning.”

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Preliminary MH17 report cites ‘external cause’ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/preliminary-mh17-report-cites-external-cause/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/preliminary-mh17-report-cites-external-cause/#comments Tue, 09 Sep 2014 08:13:21 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26334 More ››]]> MH17Dutch air accident investigators believe that Flight MH17 broke up in the air probably as the result of structural damage caused by a large number of high-energy objects that penetrated the aircraft from outside.

This features in the preliminary report on the investigation into the crash of the Boeing 777-200 operated by Malaysia Airlines that has been published today by the Dutch Safety Board.

“There are no indications that the MH17 crash was caused by a technical fault or by actions of the crew,” the report states, adding that the aircraft was flying in unrestricted airspace, under the control of ATC, following the route and flying the altitude as cleared by ATC.

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It outlines that on 17 July 2014, the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-2H6ER operating as flight MH17, departed Amsterdam Airport Schiphol in the Netherlands at 10.31 hrs on a scheduled passenger flight to Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia.

Malaysia Airlines had determined and filed the flight plan for flight MH17, which was approved by all involved air traffic control centres for their concerned regions.

MH17-2According to the flight plan, flight MH17 would initially fly at Flight Level 330 (FL330) above Ukraine until the waypoint PEKIT, which is on the Flight Information Region (FIR) boundary between Kiev FIR (UKBV) and Dnipropetrovs’k FIR (UKDV). From waypoint PEKIT the flight plan indicates FL350 for the remaining part over Ukraine.

According to ATC data, at 12.53 hrs the aircraft was flying within the Dnipropetrovs’k FIR, Control Sector 2, at FL330, controlled by Dnipro Control. At that time, Dnipro Control asked whether MH17 was able to climb to FL350 in accordance with the flight plan of MH17 and also to clear a potential separation conflict with other traffic in the area, another Boeing 777 flying at FL330 and approaching from behind.

The crew replied they were unable to comply and requested to maintain at FL330. This was agreed by Dnipro Control. As an alternative to solve the separation conflict, the other traffic climbed to FL350. According to ATC data, at 13.00 hrs the crew of flight MH17 requested to divert the track 20 NM to the left, due to weather. This also was agreed by Dnipro Control, after which the crew requested whether FL340 was available.

MH17 - 3Dnipro control informed MH17 that FL340 was not available at that moment and instructed the flight to maintain FL330 for a while. At 13.07 hrs the flight was transferred to Dnipropetrovs’k CTA 4, also with call sign Dnipro Control.

At 13.19:53 hrs, radar data showed that the aircraft was 3.6 NM north of centreline of airway L980 having deviated left of track, when Dnipro Control directed the crew to alter their route directly to waypoint RND due to other traffic. The crew acknowledged at 13.19:56 hrs. At 13.20:00 hrs, Dnipro Control transmitted an onward ATC clearance to proceed direct to TIKNA after RND, no acknowledgement was received.

Data from the Flight Data Recorder and the Digital Cockpit Voice Recorder both stopped at 13.20:03 hrs. No distress messages were received from the aircraft.

The investigators have analysed both recorded ATC surveillance data and radio communication obtained from UkSATSE and ATC surveillance data obtained from the Russian Federation althugh notes that analysis is ongoing.

Read: Analysis: Regime Change

Final transmissions from MH17 At 13:08:00 MH17 contacts Ukraine's Dnipropetrovsk International Airport (DNP): MH17 to DNP: Dnipro Radar, Malaysian one seven, flight level 330 DNP to MH17: Malaysian one seven, Dnipro Radar, good day, radar contact Flight MH17's last transmission was at 13:19:56 when it responded to a navigation request from DNP: DNP to MH17: Malaysian one seven, due traffic proceed direct to point Romeo November Delta MH17 to DNP: Romeo November Delta, Malaysian one seven At 13:20:00, DNP sends MH17 another radar message but there is no response: DNP to MH17: Malaysian one seven, how do you read me? Malaysian one seven, Dnipro Radar DNP makes two more requests for contact from MH17 before Russia's Rostov airport calls in at 13:22:05. RST to DNP: Listening [to] you, its Rostov DNP to RST: Rostov, do you observe the Malaysian by... by the response? RST to DNP: No, it seems that its target started falling apart.

Final transmissions from MH17
At 13:08:00 MH17 contacts Ukraine’s Dnipropetrovsk International Airport (DNP):
MH17 to DNP: Dnipro Radar, Malaysian one seven, flight level 330
DNP to MH17: Malaysian one seven, Dnipro Radar, good day, radar contact
Flight MH17′s last transmission was at 13:19:56 when it responded to a navigation request from DNP:
DNP to MH17: Malaysian one seven, due traffic proceed direct to point Romeo November Delta
MH17 to DNP: Romeo November Delta, Malaysian one seven
At 13:20:00, DNP sends MH17 another radar message but there is no response:
DNP to MH17: Malaysian one seven, how do you read me? Malaysian one seven, Dnipro Radar
DNP makes two more requests for contact from MH17 before Russia’s Rostov airport calls in at 13:22:05.
RST to DNP: Listening [to] you, its Rostov
DNP to RST: Rostov, do you observe the Malaysian by… by the response?
RST to DNP: No, it seems that its target started falling apart.

 

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Route reviewed by Airservices taskforce http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/route-reviewed-by-airservices-taskforce/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/route-reviewed-by-airservices-taskforce/#comments Tue, 09 Sep 2014 07:48:20 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26332 More ››]]> A revised air route structure between Melbourne and Cairns is now in place as part of ongoing efforts by Airservices to make the safety of the Australian travelling public its highest priority.

It follows a broader review of air routes nationally by Operation Skysafe, an internal taskforce set up by Airservices in late 2013 to reassess procedures and management of airspace.

Reporting directly to Airservices chief executive Margaret Staib, Operation Skysafe is examining airspace management to determine how the safety and efficiency of existing air routes can be enhanced.

Air route structures are sometimes described as ‘highways in the sky’, and allow commercial aircraft to fly predetermined paths between major cities.

“The taskforce undertook a body of work which has resulted in the duplication of the main, busy flight path between Melbourne and Cairns,” Staib said.

The revised route sees aircraft fly on parallel paths, rather than be assigned different altitudes on the same two-way route.

“With more than 400 aircraft flying this route each month, the removal of the existing two-way route structure which had been in place for many years improves safety for all air travellers as well as creates additional capacity to cope with future growth,” Staib said.

The revised route will also create efficiencies for airlines by reducing the distance aircraft will fly, thereby reducing fuel burn and emissions. For example, Virgin Australia has indicated that this change will deliver a saving of 7675 track miles and 34 500 kilograms of fuel per year.

Airservices has also developed a new, customised training program to build capabilities for air traffic controllers following a recommendation from the taskforce.

The taskforce is headed by Paddy Goodall, Airservices recently appointed chief air traffic controller (CATC), an experienced air traffic controller who has worked as a controller in Australia and internationally.

Operation Skysafe continues to assess air routes nationally, and to investigate opportunities to adapt existing conflict detection technology and maximise the benefits of modern satellite navigation fitted to airlines

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New NextGen rollout roadmap tipped for October http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/new-nextgen-rollout-roadmap-tipped-for-october/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/new-nextgen-rollout-roadmap-tipped-for-october/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:27:37 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26328 More ››]]> The US Federal Aviation Administration is preparing to publish crucial NextGen milestones and metrics by October 18, according to the agency executive charged with keeping the multi-billion dollar modernisation effort on track.

In a speech addressed to this year’s Air Safety Forum assistant administra­tor Edward Bolton said the agency is committed to ‘finalising a new plan and sticking with it through 2025’.

“My commitment to you is that by 18 October you’ll have a plan with my signature on it that has milestones, timelines, metrics and costs by location, to deliver capability in the one-to-three year timeframe in these areas,” Bolton told delegates.

It will likely provide far more detail than the 2014 NextGen Implementation Plan (NGIP) which outlines the status of six programmes that either provide capabilities or infrastructure upon which critical NextGen capabilities will be built.

The new targets were drawn from the same internal planning documents used in the creation of the NGIP, and, therefore, both documents should be in broad agreement.

Target dates for a specific initial set of NextGen capabilities already in develop­ment will however be mapped in detail.

The crucial policy document will also be aligned with priorities set by the NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC).

NAC also said it is on track to present four near-term priorities for NextGen in September which include: Performance Based Navigation (PBN), surface opera­tions, multiple runway operations, and Controller Pilot Data Link Communica­tions (CPDLC).

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Europe’s tracking technology deadline slips http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/europes-tracking-technology-deadline-slips/ http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2014/09/europes-tracking-technology-deadline-slips/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:22:13 +0000 http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/?p=26326 More ››]]> Europe will align the deadline it has set its airlines to equip with  ADS-B Out aircraft tracking equipment to reflect later US timeframes.

The current ADS-B Out requirement in Europe is January 8, 2015, for new aircraft, with retrofit installations due December 7, 2017. That has now been changed to June 8, 2016, for new aircraft and June 7, 2020, for retrofit. The US ADS-B Out fleet-wide mandate is set at January 2020.

Meanwhile Federal Aviation Administration chief Michael Huerta has warned industry there is no chance of the 2020 deadline being relaxed. Speaking at this year’s EAA AirVenture, Huerta said: “ADS-B Out is one of the foundational elements of NextGen and it allows us to bring you many benefits. I know many of you are concerned about the 2020 mandate to equip with ADS-B Out. There’s still a five-and-a-half-year window to get that done, but the date is firm. I encourage you to equip before the deadline to avoid delays at repair stations as the deadline draws closer.”

The European Commission has announced its intention to change the regulation although it is not official until voted for by the European Union’s Single Sky Committee. It will then be adopted by the European Commission.

A Commission spokesman tells Air Traffic Management that the revision of the ADS-B out mandate will be conducted in two steps: “The first step that has just been decided consists of a first revision of mandate namely the application dates for airborne equipment. The second step will review and reassess the mandate in depth; this second step will start now and should result in concrete proposals by the end of the next year if all goes well.”

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