Flight data details Air Canada SFO near-miss

VIDEO Data provided by FlightAware showing the position of the four aircraft on the taxiway of a San Francisco airport show how close an Air Canada aircraft came to landing on a taxiway rather than the runway, according to The Bay Area News Group.

The Air Canada Airbus A320 was cleared to land at a runway at San Francisco international airport on June 7 and the pilot began descending toward one of the taxiways, where four aircraft were waiting to take off.

Audio recordings of the conversations between air traffic control and pilots, posted on the Live ATC website indicate that the Air Canada pilot asked if he was cleared to land and was told there were no other aircraft on the runway.

A flight crew member in one of the aircraft on the taxiway alerts the tower to the Air Canada aircraft’s trajectory and the pilot was immediately instructed to pull up, circle around and approach the landing again. “It looks like you were lined up for Charlie [Taxiway C] there,” the air traffic controller told the pilot. The taxiway sits parallel to the runway.

San Francisco International has runways that are fairly close together. Runways 28L and 28R are only a few feet apart, although 28L was not in service late on Friday when the incident took place.

The US National Transportation Safety Board on June 11 joined the FAA in the investigation into the incident.

This animated graphic illustrates what actually happened, fusing information provided by American and Canadian aviation regulators, and also using air traffic audio to produce the clearest picture yet of what happened during the near-miss. The flight path data pulled by FlightAware comes from the Federal Aviation Administration’s Surface Movement Event Service which combines airport radar with equipment installed on aircraft to determine their position. Click on image to access the video.

This animated graphic illustrates what actually happened, fusing information provided by American and Canadian aviation regulators, and also using air traffic audio to produce the clearest picture yet of what happened during the near-miss. The flight path data pulled by FlightAware comes from the Federal Aviation Administration’s Surface Movement Event Service which combines airport radar with equipment installed on aircraft to determine their position. Click on image to access the video.

Posted in Airlines, Airports, News, Safety

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